Category Archives: Uncategorized

Life Expectancy in Zambia

Amazing stats from an amazing woman. Thanks

Letters from Lusaka

Yesterday the road in front of our house was like the Santa Monica Freeway, which is especially odd when you consider that we live 3 km out on a very poor pot-hole rock-laden dusty red-dirt road.  It’s nearly impossible to find someone’s home back here because the dozens of crisscrossing roads are unnamed, and there are no numbers or addresses on homes.  (When people come to visit us I have to give them road markers, “turn right at the three-way split and follow the bougainvilleas on your left,” then “turn left at the corner house with three German Shepherds who will escape through the electric fence and try to block your path,” etc.)

I figured the traffic was due to the half-dozen cardboard “Funeral Home” signs directing people how to get from Leopards Hill road (the main drag) to the neighbor three plots down from us who had erected a…

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Seeds has Charitable Status-Wueeee!

Hello everyone!

I just wanted to let you know that I just found out yesterday morning that we have an official charitable number  801 572 736 RR0001 so we may issue tax receipts.

We are only issuing receipts for $15.00 and up at this time, but any amount you can spare is welcome.

To issue the receipt I will need your full name, including middle initial, address and amount  and I will send the receipts to you prior to the end of February 2014.

Socio-Economic And Environmental Development Solutions (SEEDS), is our legal name.

Donate Through Paypal

If you wish to donate with your credit card through paypal you may do so by clicking here

paypal-donate (1)

You may also mail a cheque to:

 Socio-Economic And Environmental Development Solutions (SEEDS)

4 Browning Ave.,

Toronto, On., M4K 1V7

Or if you prefer, you may go to any Bank Of Montreal and deposit directly into our non-profit Business Account with the following information:

Transit # 0417

Account # 8986-442

Note:

Canada Revenue Agency has started a temporary supplement with an added 25% to the rates used to calculate monetary donations up to $1000.00.

So if you have not donated in the past 5 years and claimed it on your income tax, nows the time!

Our web site is growing at the moment but I will let you know when it is in full bloom!

www.sendseedstoafrica.org

For now you may still find out what we are doing on the blog medwoman.wordpress.com. We presently have four locations to send seeds to in Africa and are working on sending them to our Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

If you have any questions you may email me and I will sprout up to get back to you

joanne@sendseedstoafrica.org

Wishing you all a very Berry Christmas and Seedy New Year!LOL.

If you have already donated, Many, Many thanks. May you Stay Blessed!

Please pass this to anyone you think may want to assist in preserving our seed diversity, trees and elephants in the world or help people less fortunate than ourselves!

Best,

Joanne

Big Hug!

Thank you and have a SEED FULL Day!

New First Time Donor’s Super Credit-CRA

Canada Revenue Agency has started a new supplement with an added 25% to the rates used to calculate monetary donations.

So if you have not donated in the past 5 years and claimed it on your income tax, nows the time!

Donate Through Paypal

If you wish to donate with your credit card through paypal you may do so by clicking here

paypal-donate (1)

We have saved many seeds but do not have the funds to courier them to Zambia.

It costs approximately $200.00 to send the seeds and now I have two connections in Eastern Province and one connection in Western Province to send the seeds to. Therefore I need to collect $600.00 in donations to send the seeds now as the rainy season has started.

Any donation would be appreciated as it all adds up.

See the explanation of how it all works with the CRA below.

Thank you! Joanne

What is the new First-Time Donor’s Super Credit (FDSC)?

A2. Starting in the 2013-2017  taxation year, the budget proposes to introduce a temporary non-refundable FDSC that will supplement the CDTC for individuals. This new credit effectively adds 25% to the rates used in the calculation of the CDTC for up to $1,000 of monetary donations. As a result, a first-time donor will be allowed a 40% federal credit for donations of $200 or less, and a 54% federal credit for the portion of donations over $200 but not exceeding $1,000.

Example 1: An eligible first-time donor claims $500 of charitable donations in 2013. All of the donations are donations of money. The first-time donor’s FDSC and CDTC would be calculated as follows:

First $200 of charitable donations claimed: $200 x 15% = $30
Charitable donations claimed in excess of $200: $300 x 29% = $87
First-Time Donor’s Super Credit: $500 x 25% = $125
Total FDSC and CDTC: $242

Example 2: An eligible first-time donor claims $700 of charitable donations in 2013. Only $300 of the donations are donations of money. The first-time donor’s FDSC and CDTC would be calculated as follows:

First $200 of charitable donations claimed: $200 x 15% = $30
Charitable donations claimed in excess of $200: $500 x 29% = $145
First-Time Donor’s Super Credit: $300 x 25% = $75
Total FDSC and CDTC: $250

Q3. When can I claim the FDSC?

A3. As the FDSC is a temporary credit, you can only claim it once from the 2013 to 2017 taxation years.

Q4. Who is considered a first-time donor?

A4. For the 2013 taxation year, an individual will be considered a first-time donor if neither the individual nor the individual’s spouse or common-law partner has claimed the CDTC in any of the five preceding tax years.

Q5. Can both my spouse or common-law partner and I claim the FDSC?

A5. As a first-time donor, the FDSC, along with the corresponding CDTC, may be shared by you and your spouse or common-law partner in a particular taxation year. However, the total amount of donations that may be claimed for the FDSC by both individuals cannot exceed $1,000. When it cannot be agreed on the amount of the credit that each of you will claim, the CRA may apportion the credit.

Q6. Do all of my donations qualify for the FDSC?

A6. No. Only donations of money that are made after March 20, 2013 will qualify for the FDSC. For taxation years from 2013 to 2017, a new line will be added to Schedule 9, Donations and Gifts to identify the eligible portion of the charitable donations that you have claimed that are donations of money.

Q7. Where can I get more information about the FDSC?

A7. The CRA is committed to providing taxpayers with up-to-date information. The CRA encourages taxpayers to check its Web site often. All new forms, policies, and guidelines will be posted as they become available.

In the meantime, please see the Department of Finance Canada’s Budget 2013 documents for details.

Date Modified: 2013-03-27

African Dinner Benefit

Please join us for dinner or after for the entertainment.

IMG_0555

Mwaya-fruit-tree-nursery-Ripple-Africa

You will have a great time and it is for a great cause!

Note the damage done to the trees by the Elephants.

Note the damage done to the trees by the Elephants.

Date: September 28, 2013

Where: Royal Canadian Legion Branch 10

1083 Pape Ave (South of O’connor Dr.)

6:00 Cocktails (Cash Bar)

7:00 Dinner

Menu

African Babotie: Meat or Vegetarian Kale, Mango and Peanut Salad

Corn on the Cob                         Dessert Assortment

Entertainment

Advance Ticket $45 (Sept 20) Price at the Door $50

ALL Proceeds are used for The Silozi Seed Bank and Trees for Elephants

For Tickets or Inquiries please Contact Joanne

medwoman@sympatico.ca

Fenced enclosures for Tree Nursery

Hello everyone,

It is amazing how things fall into place.

Ellena mailed the last batch of seeds to Fredrick on May 1st but I did not put the Post Office Box number in the address I gave her so the seeds did not make it. Live and learn!

Now My friend Erin is going on a trip to many countries in Africa and will take 100,000 pepper seeds plus a variety of other seeds and mail or courier them to Fredrick in July 2013.

This is the package I am getting ready for Erin to take.

Note the seeds in jars now in a plastic bag in the 2nd photo.

100,000 sweet pepper seeds + variety of other seeds

100,000 sweet pepper seeds + variety of other seeds

IMG_0555

Once Fredrick gets the seeds he can start handing them out 100 per envelope and then start collecting 25 tree seeds in the plastic milk bags so we can grow more trees. He has already collected some tree seeds himself but I want to start the three step Silozi Seed Bank project trial.

It will take at least 1 year for the trees to be hardy enough to sell to the national & private game parks to feed Elephants.

I am hoping Erin can mail them or send them via DHL or Fed Ex. I am still working out the details.

From my research it will cost me approximately $184.00 to send the seeds from Toronto via DHL and I hope to send them every two months as that is how long it has taken to collect 100,000 seeds this time.

Fredrick has to build pole and grass fenced enclosures for the tree nursery so people don’t steal the growing seedlings. I think that should cost about $200USD.

If you can spare $5.00 or $10.00 to donate to build these fences I would really appreciate it. You may donate from your credit card via pay pal. just click on the link below. Thank you so much!

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=3MBYF6GYLX9JG

Watermelon with seeds please!

IMG_0501 IMG_0502 IMG_0503 IMG_0504 IMG_0505 IMG_0506

I started my trial seed garden around May 15th.

It is only about 6′ x 8′ but I managed to fit quite a few plants and seeds into it.

I cheated and bought some plants that were already started.

I knew it was early and I was a bit concerned about all of this cold weather we have been having this spring. I even covered everything with plastic bags on the night they predicted frost.

I learned a great trick from my mother in law to stop grubs from eating the leaves without killing them by drowning them in beer.

You put crushed egg shells around the plants and the grubs don’t like to pass over the sharp broken shells.

I think I will try crushing them by hand in future though as the blender turned some of them into powder.

Here they are spread around the plants

IMG_0549

Here is my seed garden now as of June 13, 2013. I say seed garden because I will be letting a lot of it go to seed so I can collect the seeds to send to Africa.

I have planted:

broccoli, brussels sprouts, carrots, climber beans, cucumbers, yellow zucchini, green onions, basil, thyme, rosemary, organo from plants.

red & white potatoes, sunflowers and sweet peppers of course from seed

coriander, tarragon, parsley and cherry tomatoes came up from seed

in the ground from last year.

I  have  a blackberry & blueberry bush squeezed in there as well.

Isn’t it beautiful!

Through saving seeds to send to Africa I have learned more than my stomach can handle. I say my stomach because I feel sick when I think of the way Monsanto, Dow and many companies are destroying our food supply by genetically modifying our vegetables.

Round up is a Monsanto pesticide that kills plants. Monsanto developed a genetically modified canola seed that is not susceptible to Round Up.

In 1997 Round up was introduced in Canada and three farmers in Saskatchewan planted round up resistant canola. Their farms were adjacent to 70 year old Percy Schmeiser’s farm.

Canola is a self pollinating crop so the Round up resistant gene is spread to surrounding fields naturally.

Monsanto sued Percy Schmeiser in 1998 for planting Round up proof canola seed which he didn’t plant. Therefore a farmer who has been saving CLEAN seed each year to re plant would have the round up resistant gene in his seeds if it was planted next to a Round up crop.

If you want to read more just do a google search on Monsanto in Canada. There are many cases where Monsanto has sued farmers for using their PATENT seed and now thankfully many farmers are suing Monsanto for having their seed on farmers fields who never planted it.

We Must Stop Monsanto or we will not have CLEAN seed much longer.

I wanted to buy a watermelon so I could save the seeds for Africa. I went to Sobeys and was told that they don’t order anything but SEEDLESS watermelons.

I was also told I could get one at Knob Hill Farms so I went there and bought one.

I subsequently emailed Sobeys to show my distain and emailed Knob Hill Farms to thank them and tell them to keep up the great work.

IMG_0548IMG_0551

Out of these two pieces of watermelon I got 59 seeds.

Wish me luck that they grow in Africa.

I will plant one in my trial seed garden and see.

So if you have a watermelon this summer, save the seeds as they may not be around much longer.

Also if anyone has any seed from those beautiful field tomatoes from days gone by, save those or donate a few to The Toronto Seed Bank. They will put them in a vault.

Save Those Seeds. Thankx

Great team for the Silozi Seed bank

 

I just spoke to Fredrick on May 7,2013 and he has completed the compost pit. He had to purchase manure so hopefully this compost will be enough to last for this year. The 2 metre x 1 metre pit is supposed to fill 8000 small black polythene tubes. He will start filling in the planting tubes with tree seeds this June. He has collected some himself but hopefully The Silozi Seed bank will start functioning soon and the participants will hand in a good variety of tree seeds.

Fredrick, Car & I

Fredrick, Carl & I

I must say that something is guiding me through all of this. So many things have happened and are falling into place it is amazing.

So I am very excited about our team.

We are in the process of setting up the non-profit charitable organization.

It is called S.E.E.D.S. Inc. which stands for Socio-Economic and Environmental Development Solutions.

Officially you need 3 Directors to start a non profit, therefore we have:

President-Joanne Hutchinson, owner Med Management, author.

Secretary-Ellena Andoniou, Ph.D Candidate, Geography, Western University.

Treasurer-Sorcha Kellett, Nutritionist/Dietitian(member I.N.D.I.)

I have met some amazing people and hooked up with old acquaintances that are helping this quest move forward quite nicely.

By chance I met Ellena’s mother who works at the Bank of Montreal near us through Carl’s parents. I was opening a US bank account and told her about my projects re the environment ie. my polar bear book and The Silozi Seed bank and Trees for Elephants.

Also by chance I met Sonny Cho who went to school with Carl and his sister Michelle. Sonny now is a fund raiser for Centennial College and he was looking for a hospitality/trade school in Africa to send students too. He was helping me learn the ins and outs of fund raising and sent me a brochure from western University. Well guess who’s picture was in the brochure? Ellena.

So I went back to the BMO and gave Ellena’s mom my email address for Ellena and the rest is history.

Then I was walking back from the grocery store and ran into Sorcha.

I hired and trained Sorcha how to use Quickbooks at a doctors office I worked at many years ago. We chatted as we walked and had a meeting the next day and now she is on board. Sorcha is a Nutritionist/Dietitian so she will be a great help with these projects.

As you all know I am saving seeds along with 4 friends. I also have the Sobey’s  near me,  Ingo, my next door neighbour who is a chef. My biggst supporter so far has been Frakin Catering . Darryl who owns Frakin Catering has saved so many seeds for me he is proving to me that this can work.http://frakin.com/.

Remember how I said earlier that I am so privileged as this is all falling into place.

Ellena is a Global Health Conference Co-Ordinator for SASA Scientific Committee & Editorial Board. SASA stands for The Society for the Advancement of Science in Africa (SASA) is hosting it’s inaugural conference The Advancement of Science in Africa and seeks to engage the international scientific community in finding paths towards strengthening the scientific and technological capacities of communities, schools, and institutions in Africa.

SASA ( South African Science Association) asked Ellena to come and speak at this years conference on April 25,2013. This was amazing to me as it was a less expensive way to get some seeds to Africa so Ellena kindly mailed from South Africa, over 15,000 seeds to Fredrick on May1,2013.

I sent sweet peppers, pomegranate, sunflower, cherry tomatoe,…

It only cost Ellena $21.00 to send them from South Africa and I have yet to mail them from Toronto so we shall see what it costs when I do.

That should give him a good start at handing out 100 seeds to each person. Therefore he can give 150 families 100 seeds each to start this project.

I will keep you posted as to how it all goes. As of today he has not recieved them yet. The mail system is really slow there as Mongu is 640K from the capital city Lusaka and I had to mail them to The Country Lodge as it had a proper address.

Here is the process for a batch of 43 pepper seeds I received from Ingo, the chef who lives next door. I have determined that it is best to take the seeds off the stem asap and lay them on the parchment paper. They tend to get slymy if you wait too long.

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drying on two sheets of parchment

drying on two sheets of parchment

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ended up over 10,000 seeds when dried

ended up over 10,000 seeds when dried

Thank you for your donation everyone!

10,000+ seeds so far

Only after the last tree has been cut down;  Only after the last river has been poisoned;  Only after the last fish has been caught;  Only then will you realize that money cannot be eaten.

– Cree Indian Proverb

“Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better, it’s not.” – Dr. Seuss

I borrowed these two sayings from another blog I am following called “Oahuhiking” . I don’t think the author will mind as she too wants to clean up the globe. Thanks Oahuhiking.

So for those of you who don’t think I am crazy, you probably will now.

I was up until 2:30am Monday Mar.25/13 counting pepper seeds.

I am sure you know that a pharmacist will use a little paddle and a tray with a pour spout on it to count pills and then pour them into the containers. Well I didn’t have a tray so I used the middle of a magazine, actually a book magazine

( Red Tuque Books) that my book will be in this September, to count my seeds.

I sat in bed and very patiently slid two seeds at a time down the centre of the magazine. I used stick men to mark off each set of 20 and then again when I counted 100 seeds. It took me 1/2 hour to count 1000 seeds.

IMG_0357 IMG_0359 IMG_0360 IMG_0362 IMG_0363So now I know that 1 1/4 oz of seed equals 2500 seeds and only weighs 1/2 oz.

I have 4 oz’s of seed in the jar which equals just over 10,000 seeds.

The majority of this jar of seeds was saved by a friend of mine Sabrina and her boss Darryl who owns Frakin Catering, in Scarborough.

Sebrina works part time in Darryl’s catering business and Darryl has so graciously offered to help save seeds.

Thank you so much Darryl & Sabrina.

The good thing about counting out these seeds is that I was able to weigh them. Can you immagine how many seeds I will be able to fit into a 50lb-32kg suitcase.

Technically, 1/2 oz. of seed =2500 seeds. Therefore 50lbs. of seed = 4,000,000 seeds. That will produce a lot of gardens in Zambia.

I will let everyone know how many seeds I am actually able to fit into a suitcase when the time comes.

So as you can see I used the latest in modern equipment  to determine how many seeds I have so far and this is not even including the seeds from other people that are saving them for me.

Thanks again to everyone who is saving seeds at the moment. It will be interesting to see how many we can save.

Happy Easter! Joanne

The Silozi Seed Bank and Trees For Elephants

An older giraffe with darker spots

An older giraffe with darker spots.

Notice the light spots

Notice the light spots on a younger giraffe.

Hello everyone!

I hope you are not suffering from cabin fever too much this year.

Spring is around the corner!

Here is something to warm you up. Think Africa!

This blog is to tell you all about two new co-operative projects I have started.

The Silozi Seed Bank and Trees for Elephants.

I thought of the Trees For Elephants idea in August 2011 when I went to Zambia the first time and The Silozi Seed Bank this winter.

Since May 2011, I have been saving and drying seeds out of the vegetables I purchase for personal use. I have saved all pepper seeds, both hot & sweet, pumpkin, squash, tomatoe, all herbs, avacado and my latest trial seeds are pomegranate, plum, olive and date pits. Basically anything that will grow in hot climates.

How many of you remember saving, or still do save,  the tops of pop cans to buy someone a wheelchair. Well if you would, I would really appreciate it if you could dry and save seeds for me to take to Kalabo, Zambia. Also if you have any unused, return utility envelopes and washed out clear milk bags I need those as well.

Here is how it will work!

The Silozi Seed bank partners ( meaning you) will collect seeds, unused utility bill envelopes and washed used milk bags. Approximately 100 seeds will be handed out to each participant( Villager). Interest paid on those seeds will be 50 seeds.When interest is paid participants will receive 100 more seeds for planting. Participants must also attend a training session on cultivating, drying and propagating seeds for year round growth. Interest seeds may be from vegetables grown by participants or from fallen tree seeds around their compounds.(note: each green pepper has approximately 250 seeds).

I am hoping to start a Silozi Seed Bank mobile unit as well to reach those participants in rural areas and schedule revisits according to projected harvest.

Colalife, in Zambia has a wonderful idea to deliver Zinc Aid Pods  to remote areas by utilizing the Coca Cola delivery people. There is a huge incidence of child mortality due to diarrhea in Zambia and  Zinc and a salt/sugar combination will easily combat the diarrhea.These Aid Pods fit perfectly in between the coca cola bottles in the red crates. Check out their web site http://www.colalife.org.

I am hoping that I may squeeze a few seed packages of peppers into their Aid pods as they are high in vitamin A & C to help prevent blindness but that is a whole other story.

This is where Trees for Elephants comes in.

The tree seeds collected will then be used for the Trees for Elephants Program & Nursery.

Chaminuka Aug.2011

Chaminuka Aug.2011

Note the damage done to the trees by the Elephants.

Note the damage done to the trees by the Elephants.

Private Game parks have to take their Elephants to designated areas to eat the trees so they can monitor the losses.

Private Game parks have to take their Elephants to designated areas to eat the trees so they can monitor the losses.

I would like to have local people collect seeds of any trees but in particular the trees that Elephants eat.

Acacia

Sausage Tree

Baobab

Mukusi:

Mupapa:

Muwaka:

Musompa:

Kayimbi:

Mululu:

Mukwa:

Mango

Paw Paw ( papaya)

Marula

Neem

Jatropha

Moringa

I would like the villagers to collect ONLY the fallen seeds from around their compounds.

I will provide growing containers (where possible milk cartons), training and fertilizing techniques for the villagers to grow these seeds. Say 20 trees per family unit. I would also encourage them to plant trees in their own villages for shade to help stop global warming.

I will trade these seedlings with the villagers for vegetable seeds (The Silozi Seed Bank) and reissue containers to start the process over again.

I will then sell these potted trees to National Parks, Private Game Reserves and any tree planting organizations like Greenpop.org in order to sustain the program and cover costs of containers and distribution.

I will set up local people to run the program and just supervise the project via email and yearly visits to replenish the vegetable seeds. I know the seeds will grow there as I found out from Njamba’s family when Carl & I went in Aug. 2012.

I have many great contacts now in Kalabo to get this project up and running.

RippleAfrica.org has been a great inspiration and source of knowledge. Check out their web site. http://www.rippleafrica.org

Western province has the highest poverty levels in Zambia. About 80% of the population in the province is regarded as being poor and at least 70% of those in the poor category are women. Kalabo, 75km west of the capital city Mongu,  is basically cut off from Mongu except by water from November to May due to heavy rains which flood the Zambezi River onto the Barotse Flood Plains. November to January are lean months. Stored produce from the previous growing season is almost used up and in any case would need to be transported during the rainy season, while the new season’s crops and grasses are not yet productive, and at the same time fishing stops for the spawning season. Hunting and trapping animals, which might have filled the gap, is no longer available to most people, and trapping water birds is one of the few alternatives to buying flour.

In Zambia private Game Reserves and National Parks have declining numbers of trees to support Elephants. In Zambia I was told by a local that if there is not enough bush to support an Elephant, then they shoot the elephant.

If we can start to grow trees now maybe we can save the Elephant, create local economic trade and ensure tourist income for Africa.

Note: There are no elephants in Kalabo so there is no risk of the seedlings being eaten prior to transport.

I would also like to grow chilies to sell due to the fact that if planted around vegetable gardens they are a deterrent to elephants who raid gardens.

I am very fortunate to have found a new partner, Ellena Andoniou.

Ellena is currently a PhD candidate focusing on Global Health and Development and has an abundance of field experience planning, implementing and coordinating community-based probiotic food projects in Tanzania and Kenya.  She has an extensive background in HIV/AIDS, nutrition, community health, capacity building, community mobilization and project management.  Her research has allowed her to work closely with the National Institute for Medical Research in Tanzania, The Kenya Medical Research Institute, and other development and health-care organizations in the region.

Here are some more innovative ideas that I will let you know about in future blogs.

Use old world technologies to produce food year round and give incentive to plant trees which also benefit the environment

-grass covered fencing to grow seedlings

-build hand made brick water cisterns as done in Greece using gravity and a spigot not a pump to get water

-use fish feces as fertilizer, aquaponics.

-make clay toilet foot stands and when removed plant a tree in that spot

The extra income and variety of seeds will improve health, overall well being to the people of Kalabo and these models could potentially be used in many parts of Africa.

So if you have any seeds, envelopes and or milk bags, please let me know by leaving a comment and I will make arrangements to pick them up.

I have saved at least 5000 seeds this winter so far.

Keep warm and thanks, Joanne

If you would like to follow this blog and have emails sent to you when I write a new one, click the follow button in the top left corner of the blog and leave your email address.

I can’t get Zambia out of my heart!

I sit here at my computer and old man winter is at our back door.

It is -19 degrees Celsius outside and probably -25 with the wind chill.

But when I come into my office I see the pictures of Africa on my 17″ screen saver and feel warm.

It has been quite a while since I have written a blog but it is time.

I thought I had accomplished what I had set out to do by paying for Njamba and his brother Kufuku ( Brian as he calls himself in the final video). I felt relieved and told Carl that I didn’t feel the need to go back to Kalabo. Then on the 25 hour flight home I couldn’t help thinking about building a school there. I spent those hours drawing up the plans.

I know, you probably think I am crazy. Carl did at first but he knows me.

My thinking is that once they build the road from Mongu to Kalabo there will be more traffic to Kalabo and even on to the now stable Angola. Angola has a plethora of natural resources just waiting to be cultivated.

Why not open a hospitality/trade school in Kalabo to teach people how to accommodate all of that traffic. That is what I know best. I was in the restaurant business for 20 years. The people there need to learn a skill to be self sufficient and they are keen to learn.

I am presently waiting to hear from the Ministry of Education in Zambia to see if I can open K.H.A.T.S ( Kalabo Hospitality And Trade School ) in the under used existing Kalabo High School.

I have attached the ROUGH draft of my plans and they keep growing. I am making great connections with people who may help this new dream come true.

Have a read if you like and let me know what you think.

If you know anyone who would like to help with this project I am all ears.

I am still not sure of the exact names for the non profit or the school/s so these may change.

This is what I sent to Fredrick as he will be the Head Master of the school.

E.S.Z.A= Economic Stability Zambia Africa – Name of the Non Profit Organization

M.H.A.T. S=Mongu Hospitality & Trade School

K.H.A.T.S.= Kalabo Hospitality & Trade School

CLASSES

Agriculture & Gardening

Composting-good soil production

Seeds-Harvesting, Growing from seed, seed protection stands/shelters

Crop Rotation

Crops- growing, drying, cleaning, bagging & selling

Irrigation-water retention- building holding tanks for water during rainy season out of cement block

Herbs-thyme, basil, sage, oregano, tarragon, Italian parsley, chives, garlic, rosemary.

Vegetables-sweet potatoes, white potatoes, yellow onions, green onions, beets, cabbage, lettuce, maize, sweet peppers, hot peppers, beef steak tomatoes. cherry tomatoes, squash, zucchini, eggplant, beans, legumes, quinoa, melons.

Trees, lime, lemon, orange, mango, pawpaw, papaya, the trees that elephants eat

We could have a market day twice a week to sell our vegetables

Sewing and Retail

Every student will have to learn to sew!

Each student will make one of the following for them selves and one to sell in the retail store on site. The retail store will ideally be located between the guest house and restaurant.

-Uniform: F-dress M-shorts & shirt

-Apron- to be worn while working in restaurant on site

-back pack-for carrying books & personal supplies

-utility bags for carrying groceries or what ever

-Hat- for working in the garden

-Pajamas- to wear to sleep F- nightgown M-Nightshirt

– Hoodie( jacket) for warmth

-Pillow-to sleep with

-chair cushions

-sheets-to sleep with

-Blanket- to sleep with

-tablecloth-one for restaurant and one to keep or gift for parents

-towel-for bathing

-napkins for restaurant

-clean cotton to stuff in pillows

-each student will make a name label for the items they are keeping and also a label with the schools name on it to put in the product we are selling.

Knitting and Croche’

-Knit- socks, scarves, hats, sweaters, baby blankets and full size blankets, tea cozies, baby toys

Quilting

-learn how to make quilted blankets and pillow covers for bedding

Laundry & Sanitation

Each student will wash their own clothing, linens. They will wash their own uniform daily and hang to dry in their room over night.

Each student will do a shift doing laundry for Guest House & Restaurant

Each student will learn how to wash floors, toilets, walls, proper sanitary procedures.

Learn how to make soap and environmentally safe cleaning supplies, ie ash, baking soda, vinegar, use old tooth brushes as cleaning tools.

Make brooms.

Car wash

-have a car wash facility to earn extra income

Security& Landscaping

-we will combine this class so the guards have some thing to do rather than just stand around

-each student will take turns on security, girls included

-there will always be at least 8 people on security at all times

-we will train some dogs as well and have a cat for mice.

-tree planting

-animal husbandry- looking after the chickens, ducks, geese, goats

-maintain fences

Accounting & Computers- Lubasi

-each student will learn how to do basic accounting

-each student will learn how to use a computer- Word (Typing), email, internet search

( Google, Yahoo, Internet Explorer)

-each student will learn basic costing of items to make a profit when selling items

-food cost, inventory, income & expenses

-basic bookkeeping

-math

-draw fake money to use for practice in restaurant

English

-there will be an English class but only English will be spoken in the classroom, including the guest house & restaurant.

Cooking

-students will learn how to cook low cost healthy meals for the students & restaurant

-learn food preparation, hygiene, proper food temperatures to avoid bacteria, food cost,

-saving seeds for re planting

-inventory & storage

-drying and storing herbs-put in jars to sell in retail store

-meals samples

-curried rice, rice pilaf, corn bread, bread, vegetable stir fry, omelets, tortillas,etc.

Woodworking & Carpentry

  • – the students will build tables & chairs for the restaurant and to sell
  • – cashiers stand in restaurant
  • – server stand in restaurant
  • – hand washing stand
  • – also bunk beds for the dormitory and guest house
  • – double beds for guest house
  • – bed side tables for residents & guest house
  • – prep table for kitchen
  • – shelves for kitchen storage
  • – shelves for retail store
  • – sheds for animals
  • – shed for garden tool storage
  • – shade covers for seedlings
  • – stall to sell vegetables
  • – fencing
  • – an outdoor covered area for out door classes for gardening
  • – students would learn the basics of carpentry using hand tools
  • – safety

Art, Painting & Signage

-paint signs

-varathane signs

-paint big seeds to sell with school name on them

-paint school walls

-varathane furniture

-paper mache art to sell

-possible painting material, table cloths, napkins, curtains

Electrical

-Learn the basics of electrical

-computer cables

-solar power

Plumbing

-toilet installation & repair

-repair taps

-make outdoor molds for toilets, then plant a tree on top

-build water reservoirs to collect water during rainy season

-basic plumbimg

-fish fertilization system

-irrigation

Restaurant

-students will learn to set tables, serve guests, clear tables, do dishes, give customer the bill, collect money( using the fake money), give proper change,

-write menus

-inventory

-portion size for food cost

– clean restaurant

-opening and closing procedures

-napkin folding, silverware roll ups.

-there will be a cashier handling all of the real money who will start with a float and count the cash brought in at the end of their shift.

Guest House

  • – there will hopefully be a 10 room guest house
  • – students will learn how to run a guest house
  • – cleaning, making beds, refilling soap, coffee supplies
  • – insect control
  • – purchasing items needs to run a guest house
  • – collecting payments( using fake money), invoicing

I am not sure of all the details but the idea is that the facility would be self sufficient.

I might have someone to invest in this project but I have to know the costs first before I speak to them further.

I would like to have 50 girls & 50 boys

There would be an entrance fee equivalent to one 50lb bag of rice, ie tomatoes, maize, vegetables, cotton, chickens, goat, fish, sweet potatoes etc.

We would need the entrance fee for start up to feed all of the students.

Possible Additional Training-Extra curricular activities

-Set up a day care, pre school for the neighbourhood

-choir

-sports-football team, running club, volley ball, badminton

-fish fertilizer programe

-cement water tanks, rain barrels

-paper mache crafts

-get community involved, seed production, adult literacy, planting trees

Items needed

  • – a pick up truck
  • – a trailer would also be good to pull behind the truck to bring supplies
  • – wood working & gardening tools
  • – dishes ,cutlery, pots & pans, utensils for restaurant
  • – two large refrigerators, maybe three
  • – two large freezers, maybe three
  • – cooking stove
  • – outside BBQ
  • – fabric and thread supplier
  • – wool supplier
  • – notebook and school supplies
  • – office supplies
  • – garden seed container supplier
  • – cement block supplier to build cisterns to hold water during rainy season
  • – plumbing supplier
  • – 5 computers
  • – 5 sewing machines- we may have to start sewing by hand
  • – large bins to make composters and catch rain water
  • – electricity
  • – indoor plumbing
  • – a building to facilitate
    •  student residence 26 rooms with bunk beds- 4 to a room
    •  two rooms with only two students who are student monitors
    •  guest house-10 rooms with double bed & two bunk beds in each room
    •  5 rooms for teachers-double bed( sewing, gardening, Carpentry, cooking, restaurant)
    •  1 room for me with double bed and one set of bunk beds for guest teachers from Canada
    •  1 room for Frederick ( Operations Manager) with double bed and if you want one set of bunk beds
    •  1 room for Lubasi ( Accounts manager/teacher)with double bed and set of bunk beds
    •  1 room for Kufuku( Security/ landscaping Manager) dbl bed & bunk beds
    •  1 room for Njamba( assist Lubasi/teacher)- he is good at math
    •  restaurant- 20 tables
    •  retail store
    •  kitchen facilities
    •  laundry facilities
    •  shed to store gardening tools including, pots & seed starter bags for growing
    •  housing for chickens, ducks, guinea fowl, geese
    •  housing for goats
    •  shed to store feed for animals
    •  outdoor covered area for classes
    •  sewing room
    •  car wash area
    •  4-5 class rooms

Lumber Mill

We may also plan to have a lumber mill and send the students to work at the mill.

This is not my area or expertise so I will leave that to you Frederick to look into what we would need and what the start up costs would be.

The only thing I request if we cut trees to mill that we plant two for every one we cut down.

This is the basic plan that I am sure will grow as we think of things we could do.

As I said before it will not happen quickly.

We have to get you a computer so you and I can communicate more easily.

I can get one in Canada for about $450.00 CND or 2.5 million KW but it will cost me $621.00CND or 3.2 million KW approximately to send it by DHL.

Therefore I don’t know if it is better to just wire you the money and you can buy a decent one that works well.

I have to raise the money to do that. I only work part time and I have lost some work recently. I just applied for three positions yesterday so maybe something will come up.

I also have to look into how to start a Non Profit Organization. I will let you know how that goes. Apparently I need a board of directors and they will make all of the decisions.

I hope you and your family are well!

All the best

Joanne

PS. If you can think of a better name for the Non profit organization I would be happy to hear it. Maybe some thing with Barotseland, Western Province or Silozi?

Additional Thoughts

-we could make a brick coal or wood oven to bake bread etc.

Arts & Crafts

-we will need to make our own signs

    • • Market days & times
    • • Retail store
    • • Boat and bus to market
    • • Furniture for sale
    • • Class room signs

-we can make guava jam, peanut butter and mango chutney

-make cotton mattresses for the beds

-make candles & holders

-bags for people to carry what they purchase

-people can trade goods for product ie food, fish, etc.

The trees that elephants eat.

I know you must think I am crazy but we need to start all the villages west of Mongu planting the trees that elephants eat.

If we put them in pots and when they are about 1 foot high we can take them and sell them to all of the private safari lodges and National Parks who have elephants and plant them in an area that has been stripped of trees.

With out elephants you don’t have tourism.

Western Province does not have elephants west of Mongu so the trees would be safe from Elephants stealing them.

If you plant hot peppers near the trees you are trying to grow the elephants will stay away as they don’t like hot peppers. We can sell them too.

So Frederick we need to start collecting the seeds NOW to plant these trees.

Lumber Mill

Carl thinks it would be best to have a portable mill but this will only do shorter pieces of wood less than 20 feet long. That way we can keep the mill safe by the school and take orders for wood.

We have to look into this because the wood has to age/cure after it is cut so it will not warp. It will probably be faster in Zambia because it is dry there in winter. We will also need a storage facility to keep it dry in the rainy season. Lots to plan, research and think about!

In Canada a portable saw mill costs approximately $23000.00. It is best to fell the trees from December to Feb when it is cold so the sap is down in the roots and then the trees dry more quickly.

Then you mill them in March & April and they cure and are ready to use in  July –November.

I have been in touch with Fredrick by text but it is hard to plan a school that way.